EconoUs2017 Workshops

The information on this page is subject to change.

Sessions at EconoUs2018 will fit into two formats. Storytelling sessions will share stories of success or struggle and the key lessons learned. Skills-building workshops will be interactive sessions that will teach skills that can help create ‘an economy that works for all’. Sessions will seek to:

  • create new and strengthen existing relationships among community leaders who share similar challenges, concerns, goals & values;
  • promote new ideas, resources and strategies to strengthen CED efforts;
  • contribute to skills development, capacity building, networking and information sharing;
  • provide opportunities for learning and dialogue on the diversity of approaches and models led by urban, rural, aboriginal, linguistic and cultural minorities, and northern communities to meet their needs;
  • advance regional and Canadian policy agendas to strengthen communities by supporting and investing in CED.

English Sessions *EN*

Bilingual/French Sessions *EN/FR*

STORYTELLING SESSIONS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

 

 

BLOCK A (9:20am – 9:45am)

S1. INFORMATION TO COME *EN/FR*

 

S4. City and Community: Co-Creating Inclusive Prosperity *EN*

Explore the innovative way in which the City of Vancouver has chosen to work with community stakeholders to better assess and implement the community economic development aspects of the Downtown Eastside local area plan. City staff embarked on a truly collaborative process by convening community representatives including residents with lived experience of poverty, the social enterprise sector, traditional non-profits and local business improvement associations. This voluntary group co-created the policy report to City Council, recommended and launched quick-start CED projects and commissioned informative research studies. The resulting CED back-bone organization, Exchange Inner City, is an excellent example of what can happen when cities and communities work cooperatively to make change.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S7. How Can We Convince Buyers to Buy Social? *EN/FR*

In 2017, after eight years of promoting social purchases among companies committed to responsible purchasing, Espace de concertation sur les pratiques d’approvisionnement responsable (ECPAR) conducted a broad review of progress across Canada and Europe. What have we learned from this research? What are our tools today to convince institutional buyers that social purchasing contributes to the common good? What can we learn from the evaluations of our training courses? ECPAR will share resources and explain how they are not the same today as they were eight years ago. What we have learned has led us to change the way we talk to buyers and what tools we offer.

Session Lead:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S2. How an Environmental Non-Profit can Contribute to Local Prosperity *EN*

NGOs, especially environmentally focussed organizations, are traditionally not seen as important economic contributors. In the Tantramar-Memramcook region of New Brunswick, however, an environmental non-profit is making significant contributions to the local economy, environment and quality of society. EOS Eco-Energy is dedicated to energy sustainability and pursues that goal by promoting energy conservation, renewable energy technologies, sustainable community planning, and climate change adaptation. When the original plan to develop a wind farm was not possible, EOS went on to contribute directly to the creation of two co-operatively owned businesses with similar environmental goals and steady employment for up to 15 people and projects to help low-income families reduce energy. Learn how EOS used creative thinking and the principles of CED and adult education to make a big impact in south-east New Brunswick.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S5. Increasing Impact and Strengthening Networks though Collaborative Social Enterprise *EN*

Many non-profit agencies operate social enterprise as a means to generate revenue to support their mission and to provide employment and other experiences for individuals in their community. In many instances, the scale of these operations is limited by organizational capacity and other factors. DIRECTIONS Council is a province-wide network of 30 non-profit agencies in Nova Scotia, providing employment and community inclusion supports for individuals having a disability. In 2016, a network wide initiative was launched in partnership with Common Good Solutions to scale up social enterprise activity by investing in a collaborative approach. This included a process to assess shared enterprise interests and opportunities. Key priorities were set in relation to advancing new or enhanced enterprises that have guided development over the past year. A broad range of impacts has unfolded regarding the utility of a shared enterprise approach, including how non-profit agencies/networks can be strengthened through increasing collaboration.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S8. Reconnecting Youth to the Gitxsan Territory through Food Sovereignty *EN*

In the Gitxsan Territories, coordination relies on trust and relationships that develop over time. Senden is a social enterprise of the Upper Skeena Development Centre and in its initial stages it dedicated time and resources to fostering relationships. The social enterprise works with Indigenous youth from remote and rural communities to build job skills, essential skills, and entrepreneurial skills in a culturally appropriate manner through land-based programming. Senden is a model for reconciliation, merging Indigenous food sovereignty with small scale agriculture while following Gitxsan protocols. Learn how this program achieved support from matriarchs, traditional knowledge keepers and local small scale farmers and discuss barriers and challenges to achieving reconciliation particularly relating to the local food movement and local Indigenous populations.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S3. Promoting Local Investment in New Brunswick through Community Economic Development Corporations *EN*

Looking for a solution to improve access to capital in New Brunswick, the Financial and Consumer Services Commission has designed a set of rules that promote local investment in the province. What has emerged are Community Economic Development Corporations (CEDCs), investment funds that offer a 50% tax credit on all investments (i.e. shares or other eligible securities) and use their capital pool to finance local projects with revenue generating capacity. Social enterprises that need support from tax policy, community involvement, and local leadership to become sustainable are seeing real opportunities through CEDCs. Investors and entrepreneurs need to be informed as to how this investment model works and how it might support a local idea or project.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S6. Import Replacement: A Powerful Strategy for Local Economies *EN*

Small community economies can be described as “leaky buckets,” with money leaking out due to buying many needs from distant suppliers. Import replacement is an economic tool designed to complement exporting, to provide a more balanced approach to local economic development. A community (or region) focused on import replacement would seek to produce goods and services that are currently imported in order to keep money circulating in the region. The principles of import replacement will be presented, and discussion will follow to explore examples and potentials from session participants’ communities. This discussion can lead to action steps for building import replacement strategies in any community.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S9. Women's Leadership and Aboriginal Entrepreneurship *EN/FR*

Two years ago, First Nations women and the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Economic Development Commission (FNQLEDC) began a vast project on the theme of women’s economic autonomy. During these two years, we carried out an initial measurement of the entrepreneurial potential among Aboriginal women in Quebec and the obstacles to its development, an environmental study to multiply economic opportunities for First Nations women entrepreneurs, and awareness-raising campaigns for governments. The movement is growing. Aboriginal women’s leadership is truly mobilized. Together we continue to work to enhance women’s economic and transformative leadership.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

BLOCK B (9:55am – 10:20am)

S10. What's on the Menu? Dishing up Local Food in New Brunswick Institutions *EN*

New Brunswickers spend $2.6 billion on food each year, almost all of which is imported. We currently grow only 8% of the vegetables we need, and we have lost production over many years as cheaper imports have entered the marketplace. How can we build capacity to get more local products in schools, hospitals, and long-term care facilities? Cooperation in Agri-Food New Brunswick has been facilitating aggregation, storage, distribution, sales, and marketing of New Brunswick agri-food products to make healthy local food more accessible. Hear about their successes and challenges and learn how you could build capacity to get more local products in schools, hospitals, and long-term care facilities in your community.

Session Leads

*This session is offered in English only*

S13. We Change the Road as We Walk It *EN*

When Margaret and Chris first met things could have gone badly, as things often do when an exploitive economy, disabilities and exclusion intersect. Instead things started to happen, more people got together, and organizations were formed. Open Sky is a social and health co-operative located on an organic farm, providing educational supports for adults who experience barriers due to disabilities or mental health challenges. A recent Open Sky employment development program resulted in the creation of Powerhouse Co-operative, which provides living wages and sustainable employment to people who have experienced barriers. Told from two different perspectives, this story is about being seen as ‘disabled’, within a society that highly values competency, competition and fast-talking. The perspective of being ‘others’ is important to understand power and exclusion, and to find a role in breaking down barriers.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S16. Scaling the Impact of Local Business Networks through Social Procurement *EN/FR*

Interest is growing around the use of purchasing power to increase impact through social procurement. Governments at all levels, post-secondary schools, and local businesses are eager to create change, but are challenged to find and access like-minded partners. To access ethical products and services they need networks that they can easily plug into, offered by organizations that are rooted in a diverse and inclusive local economy. Following a brief overview of the lessons learned through REAP’s work in Alberta, attendees will work together to identify opportunities and challenges to implementing and scaling social procurement in their communities. Share and learn from successful initiatives across the country and compile a list of steps required to establish or leverage existing local business networks to meet the demand for social impact through purchasing across Canada.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S11. The Ecosystem Collective: A Chamber of Commerce for Low-Carbon Development *EN/FR*

Scientists say we have unleashed a mass extinction event, the sixth in roughly 540 million years, and that the opportunity given to us over the next three years is unique in history. Existing business supports and networks in Atlantic Canada and around the world are not mission-driven to address climate change. The Ecosystem Collective is a backbone organization, a multi-stakeholder cooperative that supports rural entrepreneurs and rural enterprises as leaders in the fight against accelerating climate change. It’s a new project launched by Community Forests International to build out supports that strengthen the growing community of people and businesses which share a critical mission – to transform how we live and work to meet the defining challenge of our time. Learn about the Ecosystem Collective and what they have accomplished, from launching social enterprises to saving old forests and planting new ones.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S14. Achieving Social and Professional Integration through Creative Work *EN/FR*

We want to showcase the importance of partnerships to implement social and economic inclusion programs. The Workshop of the Kent Community Inclusion Network promotes the importance of creative work as a source of pride and appreciation through the learning of sewing and art. From the outset, we noted that the problems experienced by the clients were accompanied, among other things, by mental health problems or isolation. It was therefore very early that we developed expertise in this field of intervention. Specialized in the production of articles made of recycled textile materials, the Workshop of the Network is first and foremost a social and professional integration community. The art workshop also allows participants to create works that can be sold.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S17. The 'Write' Way to CED: Publishing in Pukatawagan *EN*

Many initiatives throughout the world expend much energy on writing proposals and awaiting decisions, resulting in momentum oozing from the project at the critical start-up phase and the gradual loss of committed stakeholders. The Micro-Entrepreneur (ME), however, initiates regardless of funding – or rather, they don’t let a lack of money, seed funding or sponsorship impede bringing ideas into fruition. In Pukatawagan (in northern Manitoba) Indigenous students of the CED diploma program at the University College of the North are taking the ME approach by publishing bilingual (Cree-English) local-interest and children’s books. Learn how CED instructors can incorporate theory, application and individual financial capacity in an innovative way that creates meaning for an entire Indigenous community.

Session Lead:

  • Janice Seto (University College of the North)

*This session is in English only*

S12. The Alberta Investment Tax Credit: Canada’s Newest CEDIF *EN*

Alberta has just become the fifth and most recent province to legislate a tax credit for community economic development investments.   The province’s Community Economic Development Corporation Tax Credit offers a 30% tax credit to investors in registered CEDCs or co-ops.  This session will explain the ins and outs Canada’s latest CED Investment Fund and how Alberta is mobilizing to capitalize on this new investment tool.

Session Lead

*This session is in English only*

S15. Social Enterprise: A Global Immune System Response to the Business Status Quo *EN*

More and more people realize each day that the world cannot continue on its current path if our future generations are to survive. Environmental degradation is at an all-time high, costing 2.2 Trillion US in 2010. Sub-standard working conditions are costing the lives of hundreds of thousands each year due to poisoning, exhaustion, factory collapses and more. The world is responding to these problems. Over 5 million social enterprises have formed globally to create social and environmental change for the better. And this is just the beginning. Learn how the Social Enterprise Institute is trying to help 1M out of poverty by 2030, using social enterprise as a tool, and how you can join the movement.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

S18. Nova Scotia Social Enterprise Ecosystem *EN*

The Province of Nova Scotia has created a comprehensive plan to support and nurture an emerging, place based, social enterprise ecosystem. The Social Enterprise Network of Nova Scotia (SENNS) is a non-profit, member driven organization that represents the sector and advocates to government. SENNS released a Social Enterprise Sector Strategy while partnering with the Government of Nova Scotia to co-develop a framework for Social Enterprise growth. Learn about the co-creation process and the challenges and rewards involved in the process.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

BLOCK C (10:30am – 10:55am)

S19. Carry On Farming: Tools to Help Sustain Rural Communities through Local Food *EN*

Communities can be enhanced and even rebuilt when citizens support local food businesses and land preservation. But today, Nova Scotia is neither food sovereign nor food secure and if cut off from imports it would run out of food in three days. Galvanized by a vision of healthy farms, healthy food, and healthy communities, FarmWorks Investment Cooperative and the Annapolis Valley Farmland Trust (AVFT) have taken different but complimentary approaches to tackle modern challenges in the food and agriculture environment. FarmWorks provides capital, mentoring and promotion to qualifying food related businesses while AVFT secures and protects prime farmland from encroachment and assists farmers using a conservation easement approach to ensure farm land remains in production in perpetuity. Learn about examples of communities developing their economic futures and discuss innovative ideas, partnerships, networks, mentorship, and relationships around the themes of food production and access to land.

Session Leads:

*This session is offered in English only*

S22. Empowering Leaders: An Asset-Based Approach to Community Innovation *EN*

Organizations are always looking for alternative ways to expand their impact. At the Learning Enrichment Foundation we have used an asset-based, holistic and enterprising approach to unleash community leadership and innovation. By redesigning inherited service models, co-creating with participants and partners, and introducing new leadership and coaching tools we have generated opportunities and growth, increased staff engagement, and strengthened our relationship with the community and our partners. Learn how you could strengthen your organization from within and the effect it can have on communities and ecosystems.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

S25. Creating Community Impact through Social Procurement *EN*

Social procurement as a practice seeks to add social value to existing purchasing of goods and services and to implement Community Benefit Agreements in infrastructure investments. Local social procurement policies and experiences, from coast to coast to coast, are vital to strengthening CED efforts everywhere. Explore how working with government, anchor institutions, and local partners can help you to identify opportunities and apply social procurement tools and models in your community. Learn about existing policy, practice, and measurement examples and case studies of successful social procurement initiatives from across Canada and internationally.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

S20. Weaving together the social innovation field *EN*

SIX-Canada is an emerging platform that is working to weave together existing assets, build collaborative infrastructure and enable people, organizations and systems problem solve better. Learn more about what is happening and how you can be involved…

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

S23. Linking Arms: Collaborative Leadership for a New Economy *EN*

As CED practitioners, we face challenges that dwarf our individual capacity to change. Yet, so many of us keep our heads down, focusing on our work, often disconnected from—or worse!—in competition with allies who are trying to make positive change in their own way. In December 2017, a group of 20 community leaders came together in the first annual Linking Arms Gathering to do three things: 1) create a shared vision of an economy that works for all, 2) learn about their individual roles in realizing this vision, and 3) explore specific opportunities to work together. Learn how Linking Arms is helping to weave together the many diverse strands of the new economy into one coherent narrative, one unified movement that can be seen as a bona fide alternative to business as usual.

Session Lead:

  • Andy Horsnell (Linking Arms Community)

*This session is in English only*

S26. Regional aboriginal partnership on renewable energy *EN/FR*

The Mi’gmaq governance in Gespe’gewa’gi must be autonomous and self-sustaining. The Mi’gmawei Mawiomi leadership envisioned vast possibilities for jobs and other economic benefits that wind power could provide to our citizens from 3 community in Gespe’gewa’gi, the territory of the Mi’gmaq in the Gaspé Peninsula. Here is the story from the idea through CREATING A Major WIND POWER PARTNERSHIP. Here is how the leadership get organized behind a vision that renewable energy means Nation Building.

Session Lead: Victoria Labillois and Delphine Metallic (Wejuseg Construction)

*This session will be held in English and French*

S21. Growing Co-op Investment *EN/FR*

Investment sources adapted to the particular needs of coops are a vital part of the social finance ecosystem in Canada. The new Canadian Cooperative Investment Fund (CCIF), provides access to innovative capital, complementing existing credit union and other financing sources. This session will present the CCIF, share tips on making a pitch to the fund, and explore strategies for continuing to grow access to capital for co-operatives and social enterprises in Canada.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S24. The Enormous Potential of Business Succession through Cooperatives *EN/FR*
Many experts agree on the problem of an aging population in the Atlantic region and even across the country, but this creates an economic vacuum when it comes to the succession of our small and medium-sized businesses that are not public. Many businesses do not have a succession plan and many do not even know where to start to even think about transferring their business. For the past three years, CDR-Acadie has been working to raise awareness of the importance of entrepreneurial succession, as well as the cooperative formula as a model of entrepreneurship. With 12 companies successfully transferred, half of which have become cooperatives, we will explore the hidden potential to reduce the economic tsunami that this major challenge holds for us.

Session Lead:

*This session will be held in English and French*

S27. Transformative Change: Altering the Outcomes Downstream *EN/FR*

In a mapping exercise to measure Aboriginal business and employment capacity, Ulnooweg determined that change was needed. For change to occur, to encourage STEM careers and entrepreneurship Ulnooweg developed an engagement process that would enhance participation in these non-traditional areas. The engagement process included government, industry, academia and NGO’s in various fields. Using best practices of these organizations and with broad support one key area has been youth. Current activities include a week-long youth entrepreneurship camp, and the Ulnooweg Digital Educational Learning Initiative. A coding, digital skills, robotics and STEM focused project to Nova Scotia K-12 Mi’kmaq students.

Session Lead:

*This session will be held in English and French*

SKILL-BUILDING WORKSHOPS AND DIALOGUE SESSIONS

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

 

 

BLOCK A (1:10pm – 2:25pm)

W1. INFORMATION TO COME *EN/FR*

 

W4. Growing Community Finance in Canada: Tax Credits - Building the Movement Across Canada *EN*

Building on the success of the Nova Scotia Community Economic Development Investment Fund model, five provinces now have CED investment tax credit programs. Led by the past Chair of the BC Community Impact Investment Coalition, this interactive session will compare the strategies that have worked for establishing tax credits in different jurisdictions, examine how existing programs can be strengthened, and look at what’s next to grow community finance in Canada.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

W7. How do We Talk About an Economy that Works for All? *EN*

Despite growing global interest in economic activity that works for people and the planet, community economic development has seemingly not caught on as a unifying model to describe local economic action addressing all forms of sustainability. Research completed by CEDEC in 2017 identified a gap in understanding and interest in CED as an approach in Canada. In this session, leaders from two of Canada’s foremost CED organizations will host a dialogue about communicating, branding and positioning CED, drawing on new ways to describe their work to generate interest and support, and leveraging the idea of EconoUs ‐ that the economy can be by and for ‘us’.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W2. INFORMATION TO COME *EN/FR*

 

W5. Scaling Up Employment Social Enterprises Across Canada: Advocating for Social Costs Funding in Your Community *EN*

This workshop will increase participant’s knowledge of employment social enterprises — businesses that create jobs for people facing barriers to the labour market. The workshop also will provide participants with a chance to use Toronto Enterprise Fund‘s ‘social cost accounting tool’; share strategies to build a stronger ecosystem of support for employment social enterprises regionally; and provide an opportunity for the co-creation of national strategies to advance Employment Social Enterprises support nationwide.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W8. Leveraging Employer Partnerships to Create an Inclusive Labour Market *EN*

Taking a deliberate approach to employer engagement is critical in creating sustainable solutions for an inclusive local economy.
This session will provide practical strategies on how organizations can create and maintain relationships with businesses that support employment opportunities for multi barrier job seekers. Participants will be provided with a resource guide that they can take to their own community to build and maintain productive relationships with industry partners.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W3. Peer Coaching: A Collaborative Leadership Lab *EN*

Expand your network, learn new skills, and get support to do your important work from other CED professionals! Would you like to have a small, trusted group of peers—other change-makers like you—to help you succeed in your work? A group where you could get fresh perspectives, practical advice, and new contacts? A group that would support you and hold you accountable to take action to reach your goals? Get first-hand experience with the peer coaching group process. Participants are challenged to bring an actual problem of their choice, which they will have the opportunity to explore with their peers. You’ll have the option of continuing with your coaching group after the conference.

Session Lead:

  • Andy Horsnell (Linking Arms Community)

*This session is in English only*

W6. An Intentional Collaboration to Grow a Local CED Ecosystem *EN*

What can happen when local CED initiatives join forces to build a stronger CED ecosystem in one of Canada’s poorest but ever changing communities; Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside? Exchange Inner City, Buy Social Canada, and CIRES have come together in a collaborative, creative, and innovative effort integrating, co-locating, and leveraging each others’ skills and resources to support the growth of CED efforts in Vancouver. By combining engagement, social procurement and social enterprise support and access to affordable space, the three organizations are working together to achieve a collective impact that exceeds the sum total of their individual efforts.

Session Leads:

*This session in English only*

W9. Moving Local Knowledge and Experiences into Public Policy *EN*

Too often local leaders and community organizations have substantial information and experience that can positively influence public policy. Unfortunately, the opportunities to bridge local knowledge into public policy appear to be limited. This session will share recent evidence from public policy makers across Canada on how to best translate local knowledge and experiences into a format relevant for policy makers. Strategies for moving local knowledge and experiences into public policy will be showcased. The session will build and enhance capacities in public policy change, storytelling, and building sustainable communities.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

BLOCK B (2:35pm – 4:00pm)

W10. Community Benefits 101 *EN/FR*

Mercedes Sharpe Zayas and Alejandra Bravo are co-facilitators of the Power Lab, a new leadership learning initiative generating economic and democratic power in historically disadvantaged and equity-seeking communities. They will introduce community benefits as a strategy to create and share the economic opportunities tied to public infrastructure projects more equitably. They’ll draw on their own organizing experience in neighbourhoods like Parkdale and Rexdale in the Greater Toronto Area as well as case studies from other jurisdictions. This interactive workshop is for participants who are curious about this approach to community economic development but have had little or no previous experience with it.

Session Leads:

*This session will be held in English and French*

W13. Community-Based Social Innovation Labs in Rural, Remote and Northern Communities *EN*

In 2015 Ecotrust Canda, in partnership with Radius at SFU, pioneered LEDlab, a place-based, time-bound Social Innovation Lab designed to identify and support social enterprise in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. LEDlab brought multiple parties together to forge consensus on strategy and practical methods to support the community. Taking lessons learned from LEDlab, Ecotrust Canada is adapting the model to the realities of Prince Rupert, a coastal community of 12,000. The North Coast Innovation Lab is designed to identify social enterprise and business ideas and support job rich new economic activity. The success, or failure, of the North Coast Innovation Lab in encouraging initiatives that foster socio-economic resilience within the community, serves as an important precedent for the role of social innovation in sustaining and improving rural, remote and northern Canadian communities. Learn strategies for meaningful community outreach, tips for transparent social innovation lab informing and design, advice around identifying feasible, tangible projects and partnerships, understanding the socio-economic context of the host community, and framing community challenges into change lab areas of focus.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W16. INFORMATION TO COME *EN/FR*

 

W11. Revitalizing Communities: Changing the Destiny of Rural Towns *EN*

Anyone who has ever watched as businesses in their community close one by one and youth and skilled workers leave to find work elsewhere knows the sense of apathy and doom that settles in, permeating every effort people make to try to change things. While every rural community faces its own unique set of challenges, many new pressures defining and reshaping rural life are common to towns across Canada: declining populations (particularly of young people and skilled workers), aging infrastructure, fewer services, and challenges with business succession. Learn how the small rural community of Greater Dorchester is breaking the cycle by working together strategically and letting nothing get in the way of their vision for a vibrant healthy community and economy.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

W14. Building Bridges to Employment through Social Enterprise *EN*

Supportive programming and business development combined can drive successful outcomes for at-risk youth. Learn about the approach utilized by Choices for Youth, which leverages social enterprises, on-the-job support, and wrap-around support to create diverse and transitional employment for youth who cannot access the traditional labour market. Two social enterprises, Impact Construction and Sucseed, will be highlighted, exploring their successes and challenges and actively discussing their approaches in delivering a triple bottom line. Find out how new social enterprises are incubated to be both appropriate in the context of the market and the population served.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W17. Breaking Down Barriers: A Community Approach towards Changing the Landscape of Employment *EN*

Innovative employment services are bringing entirely new opportunities to individuals from historically, and currently, underrepresented populations. Developed in partnerships with community-based organizations, employers, trainers, government, employment service providers, and community members, the New Opportunities for Work (NOW) program is a holistic asset-based approach, grounded in community-identified factors deemed necessary to foster meaningful employment and welcoming, inclusive communities. This interactive workshop explores best-in-class community approaches to ensuring underrepresented populations have the opportunity to achieve sustainable livelihoods and economic prosperity. Participants will hear firsthand accounts of those impacted by this program, discuss successes and challenges arising across communities and sectors, and explore how engagement, research, collaboration and capacity building are key to generating innovative strategies to strengthen the overall health of communities.

Session Leads:

*This session is in English only*

W12. To Action! An introduction to Engagement Organizing *EN*

Engagement organizing combines traditional community organizing strategies with technology and social media to harness people power. This workshop is targeted to volunteer-centered organizations, who will learn the power of recruiting and mobilizing relationships between and among supporters, reaching a point where your supporters themselves are leading the charge, and are at the top of the “engagement ladder”. An interactive workshop, this will introduce basic principles and best practices on theory of change, engagement pyramids and pathways, and data management tools. Examples will be provided from the Nature Trust‘s organizational change integrating engagement organizing principles into every aspect of the organization.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

W15. The Four Tangents Model: A Tool for Developing Innovative Entrepreneurial Projects *EN/FR*

Are you developing or are interested in developing an entrepreneurial project in the collective economy (a cooperative, social enterprise or something else)? Through a brainstorming exercise, you will develop your own innovative project ideas by putting the “Four Tangents Model” into practice, examining the main components of the model (organizational structure, financing, operations, and networks) and exploring some examples from field experience. Taking into account all facets of the development of a business model and transposing additional dimensions that meet the needs of a more inclusive, sustainable and humane society, the “Four Tangents Model”, developed by the Conseil de la coopération de l’Ontario (CCO), is a guarantee of innovation and development for our communities. Discover a concrete, tangible, adaptable, innovative and useful tool for developing your entrepreneurial project.

Session Lead:

*This session will be held in English and French*

W18. SOCIAL IMPACT 101: MISSION, MODEL, MEASURE *EN*

Over the last five years there has been growing interest in the topic of social impact measurement – in ways that organisations can better account for the good work that they do, and the changes they bring about for people and planet. This session will demystify the topic and introduce the foundations of better performance measurement and impact management. It will offer practical insights and ideas on how to improve practice, and help participants to navigate the array of supporting methods and tools available.

Session Lead:

*This session is in English only*

Rural scape